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Electronics For Dummies [message #88896] Thu, 27 September 2018 02:41 Go to next message
Jazzy is currently offline  Jazzy
Messages: 78
Registered: June 2018
Viscount
I remembered the books that have the clause "for dummies". I'm not looking for a book about electronics for dummies, like me. I'm thinking more about learning how to tinker with our electronic gadgets by experience. Do you think this is a good idea?
Re: Electronics For Dummies [message #88984 is a reply to message #88896] Wed, 10 October 2018 02:06 Go to previous messageGo to next message
drake is currently offline  drake
Messages: 215
Registered: June 2016
Master
I did a bit of Physics in college and the hardest unit for me, was Electronics. I kind of found it hard to grasp the theory, even though the practical bit was fun so I agree with you that learning through experience could be the best way.
Re: Electronics For Dummies [message #92246 is a reply to message #88984] Tue, 01 September 2020 13:56 Go to previous messageGo to next message
The Noise is currently offline  The Noise
Messages: 141
Registered: October 2012
Master
Home supply stores have electronic basics books in the electronic section. They are not how-to manuals per se, but more along the line of telling you how electrical currents and such work. There's more to the book than just that, but I have one in my shop and it's great for reminding me of the basics.
Re: Electronics For Dummies [message #92464 is a reply to message #92246] Thu, 22 October 2020 00:17 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Porter is currently offline  Porter
Messages: 50
Registered: December 2018
Baron
These types of skills are hard to learn through reading only. You probably need to get some hands-on experience. I used to tinker with things that were already broken. If I fixed them, then that was great. If I didn't, well, they couldn't get any more broken than they already were.
Re: Electronics For Dummies [message #92687 is a reply to message #88896] Sat, 28 November 2020 21:57 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Airforce 3 is currently offline  Airforce 3
Messages: 70
Registered: December 2013
Viscount
Jazzy wrote on Thu, 27 September 2018 02:41
I'm thinking more about learning how to tinker with our electronic gadgets by experience. Do you think this is a good idea?
Don't you mean gaining experience by tinkering?

Even so, this isn't like woodworking where you can learn from experience. You should read up on this before you start experimenting.
Re: Electronics For Dummies [message #93148 is a reply to message #88896] Wed, 17 February 2021 08:46 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Souldude is currently offline  Souldude
Messages: 30
Registered: January 2021
Baron
For sure it'll be an experience experimenting with old gadgets. Lots of sources to learn from nowadays with the internet. Aside from books, there are also video tutorials available so it's all fun learning as long as you're careful.
Re: Electronics For Dummies [message #93472 is a reply to message #88896] Fri, 09 April 2021 22:49 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Csharp is currently offline  Csharp
Messages: 65
Registered: April 2012
Viscount
I would start small. Small enough to where if something goes wrong, you just get a "buzz" and not a shock.

Nothing wrong with learning by doing, just don't get hurt.
Re: Electronics For Dummies [message #93492 is a reply to message #93472] Sun, 11 April 2021 12:29 Go to previous message
gofar99 is currently offline  gofar99
Messages: 1598
Registered: May 2010
Location: Southern Arizona
Illuminati (4th Degree)
Hi, this is a difficult problem.. Like which came first the chicken or the egg? To be successful in diy electronics you really need both knowledge and experience. There are a number of rather basic tutorials on the web that are not too technical. You ought to search them out. Often at college sites. With some basic knowledge as to what various components do you can start to fiddle with some simple circuits. I would not start with any project that was powered directly from the AC mains (wall wart is OK) or that used much over about 30 volts internally. If your project doesn't work it probably won't start a fire or hurt anyone. All this is good....but I figure it takes time and patience to get to even a reasonable level of ability in diy electronics. I have been designing and building stuff for about 60 years now and constantly see or hear of someone that wants to build a complicated project for a first try. Having such a thing work on the first power up is so unlikely that it gets close to zero. If it is AC powered the most likely thing is a blown fuse (if they used one). No fuse, then sparks and smoke. I try to assist folks with their projects, but I have the impression that some don't know which end of a soldering iron gets hot let alone how to effectively use one. After monitoring and participating in several forums I have come to a conclusion that it appears to take between 2 and 3 years for someone to get fairly good at diy electronics (expert level probably about 10). It is not for folks that like immediate gratification. Sorry.

Good Listening
Bruce
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