Home » Audio » Radio » Why do people want antique radios?
Re: Why do people want antique radios? [message #88332 is a reply to message #87527] Thu, 05 July 2018 06:10 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Groot is currently offline  Groot
Messages: 75
Registered: July 2018
Viscount
Wayne Parham wrote on Sat, 24 March 2018 11:23

It's mostly just nostalgia


I have the same reaction reading the title of this topic. My father kept one and every time I visit them, I remember the times when we listen to the radio for news and the times when my father would sing along to the music on the radio.
Re: Why do people want antique radios? [message #89047 is a reply to message #87516] Tue, 23 October 2018 18:40 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Duks is currently offline  Duks
Messages: 15
Registered: October 2018
Chancellor
I don't think too many people buy these antiques with the intention of actually using them; the value is in the fact that they are no longer produced, and so rare. People do the same with gaming consoles, cameras, household items, and so on.
Re: Why do people want antique radios? [message #89433 is a reply to message #89047] Sat, 22 December 2018 19:41 Go to previous messageGo to next message
musicluvr is currently offline  musicluvr
Messages: 60
Registered: December 2018
Viscount
I used to own a music shop that bought and sold used gear and taught music lessons.
I bought an antique radio for my store window and you'd be surprised at the number of people who wanted to buy it simply because it brought back fond childhood memories.
Re: Why do people want antique radios? [message #91077 is a reply to message #88316] Sun, 13 October 2019 20:13 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Airforce 3 is currently offline  Airforce 3
Messages: 60
Registered: December 2013
Viscount
gofar99 wrote on Tue, 03 July 2018 17:27
Hi, I have several....they do two things for me, first they remind me of the craftsmanship of vintage gear and second they look cool. Smile
That is my reason as well. I would love to have a room in my house set aside for antique everything. Radio, furniture, T.V., pictures etc....... The whole room being a step back in time.

Re: Why do people want antique radios? [message #91216 is a reply to message #87516] Tue, 19 November 2019 21:34 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Miami is currently offline  Miami
Messages: 73
Registered: April 2012
Viscount
Don't forget the telephone. Keep a land line number for that purpose.

But I like antiques because they remind me of an are where things were American made and people took pride in making them good.

You don't see as much of that anymore.
Re: Why do people want antique radios? [message #91777 is a reply to message #87516] Tue, 28 April 2020 20:32 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Silver is currently offline  Silver
Messages: 73
Registered: December 2013
Viscount
Antiques and vintage pieces remind me that there will be no such thing as an antique Cloud or streaming platform. Those digital players and storage units will be technologically irrelevant soon and you'll never be able to use them again.

That, and you can't see where your music is coming from, which always creeped me out a little.
Re: Why do people want antique radios? [message #91780 is a reply to message #91777] Tue, 28 April 2020 21:46 Go to previous messageGo to next message
gofar99 is currently offline  gofar99
Messages: 1522
Registered: May 2010
Location: Southern Arizona
Illuminati (4th Degree)
Hi Everyone, I have a landline for use to give out to companies etc. It also has a call blocker and answering machine on it. I have a cell for calls I want to get from folks I know. It too has a call blocker.

Good Listening
Bruce
Re: Why do people want antique radios? [message #91789 is a reply to message #91780] Wed, 29 April 2020 10:49 Go to previous message
Wayne Parham is currently offline  Wayne Parham
Messages: 17800
Registered: January 2001
Illuminati (33rd Degree)

Phones!

I have a Western Electric Model 202 phone and a Model 302. Both were manufactured for use by the Bell Telephone company and were never sold. Back then, phones were leased as a part of the phone service. You returned the phone if you stopped using their service.

Both are genuine metal phones and both work, both dial and both ring. I've got 'em hooked up to my land line and I use them from time to time. I love to hear them ring.

/forum/index.php?t=getfile&id=2569&private=0
Western Electric Model 202

The Model 202 is a sort of delicate looking phone with a detached ringer box. It (and the 102 that looks very similar) replaced the "candlestick" phone in 1930 and was in common use until the early 1950s. Mine shown above has the handset and dial unit sitting on top of its detached ringer box.


/forum/index.php?t=getfile&id=2570&private=0
Western Electric Model 302

The Model 302 was made in the 1940s and 1950s, and some were still in use in the 1960s. It's the first one that took on the popular look most "baby boomers" were familiar with. All the electronics, the switching mechanism and the ringer are contained in this unit, as was the case for all models that followed.

The Model 500 - which looked similar to the 302 - was offered in the 1960s. Both the 302 and the 500 had rotary dials, which were eventually replaced by DTMF "touch-tone" phones, models 1500 and 2500. Touch tone phones were available in the 1960s, but they could only be used if the central office supported DTMF dialing, which took some time to rollout, especially in rural areas. So some places had rotary phones through the 1970s.

Previous Topic: Apps vs Radio
Next Topic: Refurbishing '60's or 70's Era Stereos
Goto Forum:
  


Current Time: Thu Jul 02 00:30:38 CDT 2020

Sponsoring Organizations

DIY Audio Projects
DIY Audio Projects
OddWatt Audio
OddWatt Audio
Pi Speakers
Pi Speakers
Prosound Shootout
Prosound Shootout
Smith & Larson Audio
Smith & Larson Audio
Tubes For Amps
TubesForAmps.com

Lone Star Audiofest