Home » Audio » Pro Sound » Learning without a real life teacher
Learning without a real life teacher [message #89541] Thu, 10 January 2019 12:59 Go to next message
mamoss is currently offline  mamoss
Messages: 180
Registered: May 2016
Master
Almost everything is now available online with YouTube being one of the best ways to learn how to play an instrument. All the same, setting aside some amount of time isn't always easy. A combination of both seems like the easier way out.
Re: Learning without a real life teacher [message #89549 is a reply to message #89541] Thu, 10 January 2019 23:19 Go to previous messageGo to next message
musicluvr is currently offline  musicluvr
Messages: 33
Registered: December 2018
Baron
Depending on the instrument and your own innate talent, I think you can learn the basics alone. Pitch, tempo, and things like that are better mastered with a teacher though.
Re: Learning without a real life teacher [message #89573 is a reply to message #89541] Sun, 13 January 2019 09:03 Go to previous messageGo to next message
sawyer25 is currently offline  sawyer25
Messages: 146
Registered: July 2016
Master
I learned the piano on my piano but it was so difficult to do the same with the guitar in mind. Like musicluvr says, a lot of this has to with how far your own innate talent can take you.
Re: Learning without a real life teacher [message #89583 is a reply to message #89541] Thu, 17 January 2019 11:27 Go to previous messageGo to next message
TheWanderer is currently offline  TheWanderer
Messages: 58
Registered: December 2018
Baron
YouTube can take you pretty far but to actually get good, I think you need a teacher. Someone to give you feedback on how you're playing. We all know someone who thinks they're amazing at doing something but the reality is quite different. Laughing
Re: Learning without a real life teacher [message #89667 is a reply to message #89583] Thu, 31 January 2019 13:59 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Porter is currently offline  Porter
Messages: 24
Registered: December 2018
Chancellor
I've seen the commercials for learning guitar on your own in no time and figured it was probably a money waster. Maybe it's possible to learn that way if you already have a foundation in reading music and playing to pitch.
Re: Learning without a real life teacher [message #89762 is a reply to message #89583] Sat, 09 February 2019 02:48 Go to previous messageGo to next message
mamoss is currently offline  mamoss
Messages: 180
Registered: May 2016
Master
TheWanderer wrote on Thu, 17 January 2019 11:27
YouTube can take you pretty far but to actually get good, I think you need a teacher. Someone to give you feedback on how you're playing. We all know someone who thinks they're amazing at doing something but the reality is quite different. Laughing
That is a very good point because review and feedback is a good way of gauging how well we are doing. The point is that the real teacher has to be available and both willing and able to get the best out of a student.
Re: Learning without a real life teacher [message #89794 is a reply to message #89549] Mon, 11 February 2019 21:24 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Jazzy is currently offline  Jazzy
Messages: 78
Registered: June 2018
Viscount
musicluvr wrote on Thu, 10 January 2019 23:19
Depending on the instrument and your own innate talent, I think you can learn the basics alone. Pitch, tempo, and things like that are better mastered with a teacher though.
I agree with this comment. We can learn how to read notes and how to play them, but there are parts of music that only a music teacher can teach us. However, there are people who are really gifted that they learn just by watching other people's performance.
Re: Learning without a real life teacher [message #90275 is a reply to message #89794] Thu, 09 May 2019 16:50 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Madison is currently offline  Madison
Messages: 120
Registered: June 2017
Viscount
I was looking for a child's birthday gift and ran across this smart device that's supposed to help you learn to play the keyboard. If it really works and the learner is dedicated, this could be much cheaper than hiring a teacher for lessons. That's especially true if you're just starting out, since you'll just be learning the basics and might not need a teacher until you face more difficult material. That would also let a person get a feel for the instrument to determine whether the player enjoyed it before investing more heavily and going all-in. Do you guys think you could learn this way?
Re: Learning without a real life teacher [message #90291 is a reply to message #89541] Sun, 12 May 2019 02:27 Go to previous message
drake is currently offline  drake
Messages: 210
Registered: June 2016
Master
Teacher or no teacher, the bottom line is that without dedication, no single person can master how to play an instrument. I know a lot of people who are self-taught and the common denominator is that they were willing to spare at least 30 minutes each day. They also utilized a lot of online resources, most of which didn't cost anything!
Previous Topic: DAW less complicated than Reaper?
Next Topic: Necessary skills for a would-be DJ
Goto Forum:
  


Current Time: Mon May 20 06:38:47 CDT 2019

Sponsoring Organizations

DIY Audio Projects
DIY Audio Projects
OddWatt Audio
OddWatt Audio
Pi Speakers
Pi Speakers
Prosound Shootout
Prosound Shootout
Smith & Larson Audio
Smith & Larson Audio
Tubes For Amps
TubesForAmps.com

Lone Star Audiofest